Frightmares on Celluloid Review: Feeding Time (2016)

 

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There’s nothing more exciting to me than a short film which packs so much of a punch, you feel as though you’ve just watched a full feature film. And a great one at that! Let’s be honest here, very few short films fall into this category and very few reach the caliber of Matt Mercer’s Feeding Time.

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12 minutes and 55 seconds. In 12 minutes and 55 seconds, Feeding Time accomplished more than most feature films do for me: it left me so enthralled that I wanted a sequel. Hell, let’s make it a prequel! First things, first!

 

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We are introduced to Sasha (played by Stacy Snyder of Abandoned Dead) who shows up to a baby-sitting gig after receiving a cancellation text from a close friend. What would seem like an easy buck earned from an extremely eccentric couple, played by Graham Skipper and Najarra Townsend, ends up turning into an all-you-can-eat smorgasbord, with Sasha potentially in harms way. The instructions are simple: watch the baby on the monitor and we’ll be home before it’s time for the baby to eat. A babysitter’s dream come true…….or not……………………………………

 

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What FT has going for it lies in both editing and of course narrative. As terrifying as some scenes pan out, there is a stale yet familiar story structure, reminiscent with that of the earlier works by the quirky Joe Dante. Beyond that, the classic story of a young girl being left alone in a new place, always knocks the uneasies up a notch.

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Oooohhhh! Almost forgot to mention the film’s composer! Steve Moore isn’t a newcomer to the genre folks! With such films as The Guest, Cub/Welp, The Mind’s Eye and V/H/S/2 under his belt, his resume keeps adding killer tracks!

Bottom lines ghouls, this was THE best short of 2016. Nostalgic isn’t even good enough to describe it, but you’ll definitely “feel” it! Make sure to keep your eyes peeled for Matt’s future endeavors including All the Creatures Were Stirring directed by David Ian McKendry and Rebekah McKendry as well as the animated short Cadillac Dust, directed by the very lovely and talented Abigail Braman.

 

 

 

 

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